Southeast Missouri State University

Guidelines for Dual Credit English Courses

Department of English

Southeast Missouri State University

Reviewed April 2001

Updated July 2013

Introduction

Following guidelines established by the Missouri Coordinating Board of Higher Education, the Department of English offers a program leading to credit in EN 100: English Composition. This is a three hour degree credit course providing instruction in a variety of writing modes, styles, and situations. (See syllabus and sample course outline, Appendices A and B.)

The following sections establish procedures for student admission, approval of high school faculty, the role of the Departmental liaison, and outcomes assessment. For further information, contact Dr. Missy Phegley, English Department, (573) 651-2633 or mphegley@semo.edu.

NOTE: According to the University's Dual Credit Handbook, "high school dual credit students receive a separate grade for high school and college credit purposes, and the procedures and standards need not be congruent. The students's high school grade is left to the discretion of the high school instructor. The procedures outlined in this document define procedures for assigning college credit only.

Admission

1.ACT English Subscore

All students who have an ACT subscore of 26 or higher at the time of the placement test for a given high school (see below) are placed into EN100 by University policy. Nonetheless, ALL students must take the placement test, as the score from that test is used to determine equivalency.

2. Writing Placement Essay

Students are admitted to EN 100 on the basis of a writing placement test. This test is administered by the Office of Testing Services (Lynn McLain, Director, (573) 651-2836) and evaluated by members of the University faculty.

The writing placement test is administered on-site in each high school. Test dates are normally established in April for Fall courses and October for Spring courses. In preparation for the test, Dual Credit Coordinators in each high school must identify eligible students and provide ACT scores (if available) and class rank for each student. The high school Coordinators will work with the Office of Testing Services to schedule an appropriate test date.

Eligible students who do not take the writing placement test on the scheduled date for their high school must make arrangements to take it on-campus in the Office of Testing Services.

The test consists of a single impromptu essay that students write in response to an assigned topic. Topics are class tested prior to use in placement tests. While no topic will be perfect for everyone, Southeast makes every effort to ensure that these topics are suitable for a wide range of students who have had a variety of life experiences.

Note: The placement test is similar to Part I of Southeast's Writing Proficiency Test. Information is available at the following websites:

http://www.semo.edu/writing/placement.htm

http://www.semo.edu/writing/holistic.htm

Those seeking admission to EN 100 may want to use the booklet to help them practice for the placement test.

3. Test Administration.

A.Students will have 50 minutes to complete the essay. They are advised to take no more than 40 minutes to plan and write the essay so that they will have 10 minutes for proofreading. Most students complete their work in under 45 minutes. Students will be told when they have 10 minutes left to work. If a writer does not finish, the essay will be judged according to the quality of the work that has been completed.

B.Because this is a timed, controlled test, students will not be permitted to leave until the 50 minutes have passed and all test materials are accounted for. The test questions and the students' essays and notes become the property of Southeast Missouri State and are maintained on file.

C.Use of dictionaries,handbooks, and other writing aids is not permitted on the placement test.

D.Pencils may be used, but ink is preferred. If necessary, test administrators will provide pencils and additional paper on request.

E.Students will be asked to write in cursive rather than printing their essays. Printing is acceptable, but it is important for students to clearly indicate capital letters.

F.Neatness, as such, does not count, but evaluators cannot score what they cannot read. Even so, it is best if students do not re write their essays. They should make corrections and changes on the original copy. This saves time for further proofreading and editing, and it prevents inadvertent errors made during copying. As long as corrections are clearly indicated, test readers can and will follow the writer's intentions.

4. Test Evaluation

A.Scoring. All tests are read by two University faculty. The essays are scored using a six-point holistic scale. If the scores assigned by the two judges do not agree, a third reader is asked to evaluate the essay. Touching scores are in agreement. For example, scores of 4 and 4, 4 and 3, or 4 and 5 agree; 3 and 5 do not agree. The test score is the average of the two scores assigned. For example, scores of 4 and 4 yield a test score of 4.0. Scores of 4 and 3 yield a test score of 3.5. For further information, see "Evaluation of Student Essays," pages 7-10 of the Writing Proficiency Exam booklet.

B.Criteria. The tests are scored for focus, organization, development, style, and correctness, as described on pages 5 and 6 of the Writing Proficiency Exam booklet.

C.Placement. The test results will determine student eligibility for placement into the English 100 dual credit class. 

Approval of High School Faculty

As required by the Coordinating Board, faculty teaching dual credit EN100 "shall typically have a master's degree" in English. In addition, the Department of English requires the following information and documents of those who are applying to teach this course.

  1. A curriculum vitae, including complete transcripts
  2. A letter of recommendation from the teacher's principal. This letter must include, for example, commentary on the teacher's qualifications to teach the course, the appropriateness of this course to the school's demographics, and other pertinent information. A letter that merely asks the department to consider the candidate will be considered insufficient, and the application will be returned as incomplete.
  3. A letter of application from the teacher, discussing, for example, backgrounds in teaching composition, relevant workshops and other training opportunitites taken, general philosophy of teaching composition, and the type of students who would enroll in this course and the teacher's expectations of them.
  4. Demonstrated background experiences or training in composition theory and the use of the holistic approach to evaluation gained either as a graduate teaching assistant or adjunct in the Southeast Department of English or through the successful completion of EN600: Orientation Seminar.

Background in composition theory and holistic scoring gained at another college or university as a graduate teaching assistant or faculty member may be sufficient to meet this criterion. Individuals should provide a thorough synopsis of such experience in their letters of application. Where possible, they should also provide a copy of a "Teaching Journal".

EN600 is an intensive three semester hour course designed to train incoming departmental teaching assistants and is held each year during the two weeks prior to Fall Semester. Dual credit teachers may enroll for regular graduate credit,paying the standard university tuition, or as an unofficial auditor on a no-cost basis.

Role of the Departmental Liason

Liaisons are full time members of the Department of English with experience in teaching composition. Their purpose is to assist the teacher in conducting the class in accordance with the guidelines established by the university bulletin and the departmental syllabus.

The liaison will make a minimum of three visits to the high school site where EN100 is being offered. The first of these meetings should occur prior to the beginning of the semester. The liaison should contact the principal and/or teacher to set up this initial meeting. Attendance at the annual Dual Credit Orientation, held the Saturday before University's fall semester begins, can substitute for this initial meeting. Additional conferences, as agreed upon by the liaison and the high school instructor, may be scheduled.

The liaison is responsible for informing the high school teacher in writing of his/her students' results on the placement and equivalency examinations. Copies of these results are to be sent to the chair of the English Department's Dual Credit Committee.

Outcomes Measures

During the next to last week of a participating high school's classes, students will take a writing exit test. The test will be similar to the placement test in format, test situation, and scoring. The scores on this test (the average of the two scores assigned by Departmental evaluators) will be added to students' placement test scores to yield a combined score. These combined scores, and the credit or non credit they yield, will be reported to the high school during the last week of its classes.

In order to receive credit, students must achieve a combined score of 7.0 or higher. The 7.0 may result from any combination of placement and exit test scores. Students who score 7.0 or better will be assigned the same grade given them by their high school teacher, whatever that grade might be.

Students who score 5.5 or less will be denied college credit and assigned a grade of "F" on their university transcripts.

Students scoring 6.5 or 6.0 will be assigned an "F" their university transcripts unless they submit a portfolio of their work that passes review by a University committee. The portfolio will consist of all written work done by the student through the course of the semester. Objective tests, quizzes, and exercises are not included, but any in class practice tests (described below) must be included. The portfolio, like the two proficiency tests, will be evaluated independently by two Departmental faculty, whose judgments must agree that the student should pass. A third reading will be provided, if necessary. Any evidence of plagiarism found in the portfolio will constitute failure in EN-100. "Plagiarism" includes failure to cite the source of quoted or paraphrased material, failure to use quotations marks or other devices to indicate that material is quoted, or any other failure to indicate properly that material is not of the writer's own invention.

If credit is given as a result of the portfolio review, the grade awarded generally will be a "C." However, portfolio reviewers may, at their discretion, assign higher grades if, in their separate judgments, the portfolio demonstrates consistent and exceptionally high quality or if the portfolio shows steady and dramatic improvement ending on an exceptionally high level. If the reviewers judge the portfolio to demonstrate less than acceptable work (i.e., less than "C" level work), the grade assigned will be an "F." Portfolio evaluators do not assign grades of"D."

Teachers of dual credit courses are advised to include writing on demand practice in their course designs. At appropriate intervals during the course, they should offer at least four full period impromptu essays to help students prepare for the exit test. Teachers should score these tests holistically according to the methods described in the Writing Proficiency Exam booklet. They also may want to use the test essays as the beginning step of a writing project that results in a letter grade.

One of these practice tests should be offered no later than a week before the last day to drop a course. Students who have never scored a 4 or better by this time in the semester, either on their placement test or on the practice tests, must be advised to drop their college credit enrollment. In this way, they will avoid the possibility of recording an "F" on their college transcript.

A mid-term writing administered by and scored by the liaison during an on-site visit is the most advisable way to proceed. At any rate, liaisons must verify that students whose placement scores were 3 or 3.5 score a solid 4 or higher on their mid-term on-demand essays.

Writings of these students that might be included in a future evaluation portfolio similarly must be clearly "acceptable." Students whose placement scores were 3 or 3.5 and whose mid-term on-demand writings might be scored a "weak 4" or less must be warned of the possibility of failure if they elect to remain enrolled in EN-100.

It may help students to know that "F's" remain on University records, but repeating the course adds a new grade to the transcript. It is the new grade that "counts" in figuring GPA. When students re-take any course, the first grade, whatever it is, is set aside, and the new grade, whatever it is, is used to determine credit, GPA, and graduation.

APPENDIX A: Syllabus

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH COURSE NO. EN 100

TITLE OF COURSE: ENGLISH COMPOSITION Revised 3 01

I.CATALOG DESCRIPTION: Focus on the process of effective written expression.

(Three hours.)

II.PREREQUISITES: EN 099 or satisfactory placement exam results.

III.PURPOSES OR OBJECTIVES:

A.To refine the students' composition skills as reflected in coherent thought, effective organization, reasonable stylistic force and fluency, and regularity in the grammatical and mechanical conventions generally accepted in educated usage.

B.To practice increasingly sophisticated forms of composition assignments requiring increasingly higher orders of thought.

C.To promote critical reading of their writing and the writing of their peers as a basis for revision.

IV.EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS:

A.To participate in class discussions and peer review/collaborations.

B.To practice writing as a recursive process.

C.To turn in assignments as required.

D.To achieve a level of writing appropriate to entry level into EN 140.

V.COURSE CONTENT:

A.Writing as process: informal discovery techniques, formaldiscovery techniques, problem solving techniques. 2 weeks

B.Writing to purpose:

remembering/observing; 1 week

investigating; 2 weeks

explaining; 2 weeks

evaluating; 2 weeks

problem solving 2 weeks

arguing/persuading 2 weeks

C.Writing as final edited product 3 weeks

TEXTBOOKS:

Stephen Reid, The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall Inc., 2000, 5th edition;

Lynn Quitman Troyka, Simon and Schuster Quick Access Reference for Writers, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall Inc., 2001, 3rd edition.

VII.BASIS FOR STUDENT EVALUATION:

A.At least one essay representing each of the purposes of writing

B.A final examination, including but not limited to an original essay or revision.

APPENDIX B

SAMPLE COURSE OUTLINE

16 Week Course Plan Instructor: Nina J. Graves

  • EN 100
  • UNIT 1 Introduction, myths, rituals and the writing situation.
  • Week 1 Tuesday Introduction to course.
  • Discuss syllabus and course expectations.
  • Define course objectives.
  • Ice Breaker, students state major.
  • Relate each student's major to need to write.
  • Dispel writing myths.
  • 7 minute writing warmup.
  • Hand out writer's profile.
  • Assign Chapters 1 & 2 in Reid.
  • Thursday Quiz over Chapters 1 & 2.
  • Demonstrate brainstorming.
  • Authority list.
  • Discuss analyzing your audience.
  • Discuss purpose for writing.
  • Explain mind sprint. Read 2 mindsprints.
  • Give handouts as examples.
  • Assign a mind sprint focusing on sensory
  • detail and concrete descriptions, not "Thesaurus'
  • adjectives."
  • UNIT 2 Observing
  • Week 2 Tuesday Discuss point of view.
  • Discuss "Showing not telling" and how describingobjectively and subjectively gives detail.
  • Group Work Excerpts on pp. 35 37 in Reid. Students
  • discover sensory detail, comparisons, etc.
  • Explain dominant impression.
  • Write in class 5 min. describing any object in detail.Guessing Game. Students read their papers, class guesses
  • object.
  • Assign Chapter 3 in Reid.
  • Write a 1 page description of a fruit or vegetableDescribe using sensory detail.
  • Thursday Quiz over Chapter 3.
  • Read 2 or 3 mind sprints.
  • Discuss figurative language: simile, metaphor,onomatopoeia, personification.
  • Discuss collecting and shaping.
  • Assign a 1 to 2 page paper observing and describing aspecific person, place or event and to include sensory
  • detail, objectivity and subjectivity.
  • Assign pp. 116 & 443 in Troyka's handbook discussingfigurative language.
  • Week 3 Tuesday Handout on Simile and Personification.
  • Read best fruit or veg. description papers.
  • Handout on Steinbeck's "The Turtle."
  • Read and note figurative and literal description.
  • Discuss common problems with written work so far.
  • Explain peer editing.
  • Partner editing of descriptive observation.
  • Rewrite in class.
  • Assign Chapter 4 in Reid.
  • Assign mind sprint "I remember. . . ."
  • Thursday Quiz Chapter 4.
  • Students evaluate good and bad "remembering papers("Karin and Candy" and "Those Summer Days" and "TheOld Days").
  • Read "Ode to an Orange."
  • Discuss "The Wind Catcher" in Chapter 4.
  • Discuss First Major Paper "Remembering Essay."
  • Assign pp. 84 90 in Troyka on paragraphing.
  • Week 4 Tuesday Collect first draft of remembering essay.
  • Read best "I remember mind sprints."
  • Discuss introductions and conclusions.
  • Discuss Peer Editing. Cover guidelines.
  • Peer Editing rest of class.
  • Thursday Second Draft of remembering essay due.
  • Schedule conference sessions.
  • Cliche Play.
  • Cliche exercise brainstorm on board cliches.
  • Write a descriptive paragraph using as manycliches as possible. Then, replace with originaldescriptions.
  • Understand the effect of words. Forget slang.
  • Troyka Section 21A pp. 436 442.
  • Writing Assignment.
  • Week 5 Tuesday Conferences.
  • Thursday Discuss next paper, investigative.
  • Narrowing topics, Troyka 32B pp. 605 606.
  • Develop a "curiosity list."
  • Learn library resources, Troyka 32F, pp. 616 624.
  • Brainstorm.
  • Assign: Meet the library. Select a picture of apainting from a book or magazine and make a copy.
  • Write a mind sprint describing or suggesting meaning.Attach copy to writing.
  • Assign Chapter 5 in Reid text.
  • UNIT 4 Investigation
  • Week 6 Tuesday Collect final draft of remembering paper.
  • Assign Investigative paper.
  • Students decide on a subject they want to know more about.
  • Write 5 things they would like to know about it or 5 questions about it.
  • Explain MLA Style, in text documentation and work citedlist. Refer to Troyka.
  • Bibliography worksheet.
  • Assign: Practice interviewing skills with a friend
  • Discover as much as possible, hobbies, major, sports,movies, etc.
  • Select one topic you want to know more about. Bring thistopic to library on Thursday.
  • Thursday Meet in Kent Library.
  • Find information from 5 different sources on the topicfrom interview.
  • Document the resource according to Troyka.
  • Write one sentence from each resource. Paraphrase or aquote.
  • Week 7 Tuesday Quiz on Chapter 5.
  • Collect library information.
  • Read best of class "Remembering" papers.
  • Discuss introductions and conclusions.
  • Write an introduction and conclusion for investigativepaper.
  • Introducing and punctuating quotes. Troyka Section 31E,pp. 598 599.
  • Thursday Collect first draft.
  • Peer editing rest of period.
  • Week 8 Tuesday Review transition words Troyka.
  • Review comma rule and semicolon rule.
  • Discuss paraphrasing and plagiarism. Troyka.
  • Discuss definition as a way to explain.
  • Discuss compare/contrast to make a point.
  • Work on second draft.
  • Thursday Collect second draft.
  • Sign up for conferences.
  • Discuss evaluating essays and grading.
  • Assign a mind sprint "Where Am I Now?"
  • Assign Chapter 7 in Reid.
  • Week 9 Tuesday Conferences
  • Thursday Conferences
  • Week 10 Tuesday Collect final draft of investigative paper.
  • Discuss difference between language of advertisingand the language of evaluation.
  • Read some evaluative papers of movies and of people.
  • Group Practice Evaluate a T.V. Show. One volunteerfrom each group of 3 deliver message.
  • Assign mind sprint. Read "Stopping by the Woods on aSnowy Evening" by Frost. Think about its meaning.
  • Apply this meaning to yourself in your mindsprint.
  • Thursday Quiz on Chapter 7.
  • Collect mindsprints.
  • Read "Where Am I Now" mindsprints.
  • Potato Chip Exercise.
  • Read 2 dog essays. Write an evaluation.
  • Assign evaluative paper.
  • Week 11 Tuesday Collect first draft.
  • Read best investigative papers
  • Peer editing rest of hour.
  • Thursday Collect second draft.
  • Review of comma rule.
  • Discuss subject verb agreement in Troyka.
  • Write an evaluation of any one of your mindsprints inclass.
  • Set up conferences.
  • Week 12 Tuesday Conferences in class and office hours.
  • Thursday Work on rewriting paper in class.
  • Assign Chapter 6 in Reid.
  • UNIT 6 Explaining (Mini Unit)
  • Week 13 Tuesday Collect Final Draft of Paper #3.
  • Read and evaluate good and bad "How to" papers("A Good Egg", etc.).
  • Examine point by point paragraph examples (handout).
  • Discuss Chapter 6.
  • Thursday Quiz on Chapter 6.
  • Write a "How to . . ." paper (brainstorm, shape, draft,revise, rewrite). Focus on explicit and vivid details, not
  • vague adjectives.
  • UNIT 7 Re Remembering
  • Week 14 Tuesday Collect "How To" papers.
  • Show "Telling an Old Story."
  • Discuss active and passive voice.
  • Discuss dialogue and punctuation "to show."
  • Assign mind sprint, "I recall. . ." focusing on vividdetail, figurative language and dialogue.
  • Thursday Review comma rule.
  • Students evaluate "Ralph & Tyrone," "Birth of a Stranger,""Saga of a College Washroom."
  • Read "Test Anxiety" to class.
  • Assign 4th major assignment: Personal Exp. II.
  • Week 15 Tuesday Read some "I recall" mindsprints.
  • Discuss parallelism, alliteration & consonance.
  • Choosing words.
  • Test skill at word choice. Write a short essay of no morethan 150 words not using the letters E or S in anyword.Be descriptive. Reveal problem solving ability.
  • Thursday Peer evaluation of essay.
  • Week 16 Tuesday Discuss final.
  • Review course objectives.
  • Write a purple patch about spring.
  • Teacher evaluation.
  • Thursday Collect final draft of essay 4.
  • Class forum: Discuss student accomplishment and hardships.
  • Party.
  • Bring folder with all mindsprints to class for finals.
  • Week 17 FINALS

APPENDIX C

EN 600: ORIENTATION SEMINAR

This course introduces new teaching assistants to the theories of composition which form the foundation of the teaching practices in the Department of English. Emphasis is placed upon the cognitive development of the composition students' thought processes as manifested in their writing. With this emphasis forming the foundation of their own course plans, the teaching assistants are able to formulate a comprehensive approach to composition in which they are given much latitude and responsibility within their own classrooms. In understanding the theory, the teaching assistants can unify all elements of instruction: course planning, daily lesson plans, classroom presentations and workshops, assignments, responses to essays, conference techniques, and evaluation of essays.

Introduction to the theory is followed by application in classroom practices. The freshman rhetoric text, The Prentice Hall Guide to College Writing by Stephen Reid, is examined to emphasize its cognitive organization and its emphasis on the recursive writing process. Next the "Teaching Journals" produced by all first year assistants are examined to see an actual course evolve in planning and practice. As the different journals are examined, the new assistants become acquainted with individual applications of the theories and teaching practices, understanding that they are accepted as knowledgeable professionals under supervision. In addition, the "Teaching Journals" create confidence within the new assistants that they can indeed become competent teachers of composition.

A recent addition to the orientation training consists of a videotape library of one section of freshman composition taught by one teaching assistant. Any new assistant wanting to observe how a particular lesson might be presented can check out the appropriate tape for review. Other video tapes of various activities such as conferencing conducted by other assistants are also available.

Beyond the review of the theory and practices, the manual for teaching assistants, "Dr. Staff," is discussed in detail. This manual provides guidelines for professional conduct and classroom management, samples of both functional and dysfunctional essays, and various documents relating to teaching practices and campus resources and university policies.

At the end of the orientation, each teaching assistant produces a syllabus and a course outline based on the departmental syllabus, the rhetoric text, and the theories and applications presented during the orientation. The supervisor emphasizes that this course outline is a guide and not a rigid instrument. Thus, each assistant is encouraged to be responsive to the emerging needs manifested in each class.

GUIDELINES FOR DUAL CREDIT EN140: RHETORIC AND CRITICAL THINKING

(Click here for a downloadable PDF)

Department of English

Southeast Missouri State University

Approved by committee (without appendices) 1 June 2004

INTRODUCTION

Following Guidelines established by the Missouri Coordinating Board of Higher Education, the Department of English offers a program leading to credit in EN140: Rhetoric and Critical Thinking. This is a three-hour, degree-credit course providing instruction in argumentative and researched writing. (See syllabus and sample course outline, Appendices A and B.)

The following sections establish procedures for student admission, approval of high school faculty, the role of the departmental liaison, and outcomes measures. For further information, contact Dr. Dave Reinheimer, English Department, (573) 651-2624.

STUDENT ADMISSION

Students are admitted to EN140 if they have earned college credit for EN100.

APPROVAL OF HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY

As required by the Coordinating Board, faculty teaching dual credit EN140 “shall typically have a master’s degree” in English. In addition, the Department of English requires the following information, documents, and qualifications of those who are applying to teach this course:

  1. A curriculum vitae, including complete transcripts.
  2. A letter of recommendation from the teacher’s principal. This letter must include, for example, commentary on the teacher’s qualifications to teach the course, the appropriateness of this course to the school’s demographics, and other pertinent information. A letter that merely asks the department to consider the candidate will be considered insufficient, and the application will be returned as incomplete.
  3. A letter of application from the teacher, discussing, for example, backgrounds in teaching composition, relevant workshops and other training opportunities taken, general philosophy of teaching composition, and the type of students who would enroll in this course and the teacher’s expectations of those students.
  4. Demonstrated background experiences or training in composition theory and the use of the holistic approach to evaluation gained either as a graduate teaching assistant or adjunct in the Department of English at Southeast Missouri State University or through the successful completion of EN600: Orientation Seminar.

    Background in composition theory and/or holistic scoring gained at another college or university as a graduate teaching assistant or faculty member may be sufficient to meet this criterion. Applicants should provide a thorough synopsis of such experiences in their letters of application.

    EN600 is an intensive three semester-hour course designed to train incoming departmental teaching assistants and is held each year during the two weeks prior to the Fall semester. Dual-credit teachers may enroll for regular graduate credit, paying the standard university fees, or as an unofficial auditor on a no-cost basis.

NOTE: High school instructors currently approved to teach EN100 will be approved to teach EN140 upon request.

Applications are due in the English Department no later than the end of the 8th week of the semester preceding the semester in which the applicant will first teach the dual-credit course. Late applications may be considered if extremely exigent circumstances apply; the English Department will determine on a case-by-case basis if late applications will be considered.

ROLE OF THE DEPARTMENTAL LIAISON

Liaisons are full-time members of the English Department with experience in teaching composition. Their purpose is to assist the teacher in conducting the class in accordance with the guidelines established by the university bulletin and the departmental syllabus.

The liaison will make a minimum of three visits to the high school site where EN140 is being offered. The first of these meetings should occur prior to the beginning of the semester; the liaison should contact the principal and/or teacher to set up this initial meeting. Traditionally, the orientation held on the Southeast campus before the beginning of classes in the Fall semester counts as this initial meeting. Additional conferences beyond the required three, as agreed upon by the liaison and the high school instructor, may be scheduled.

EVALUATION OF DUAL-CREDIT INSTRUCTORS

Following university policy, all dual-credit sections will be evaluated by the student using the English Department’s standard evaluation process. In addition, as with all new adjunct instructors in the English Department, first-semester dual-credit instructors will be evaluated by the liaison using the English Department’s standard evaluation process. If either of these evaluations is substandard, the instructor will be placed on probation, and evaluated by another member of the department’s Dual Credit Committee, usually the chair. If the probationary evaluation is substandard, the instructor will be removed from the dual-credit faculty.

OUTCOMES MEASURES

Mid-Term Portfolio

Students will also submit a portfolio of in-class writing no later than the end of the eighth week of Southeast’s semester. The portfolio will include two pieces of writing: an argumentative essay without sources and a source-based essay (see assignments for Essay 1 and Essay 2 in the appended “Sample Course Outline and Assignments”). For further description of the portfolio and its assessment, see “Mid-Term Portfolio (Instructions for Teachers)” in the appended “Sample Course Outline and Assignments”).

The portfolio will be used in a manner similar to the midterm examination in dual-credit EN100 classes: as a means to give students a sense of where they are in their EN140 class and in the evaluation process, prior to the final drop date for the course. In consultation with the liaison, instructors should identify students at risk of not earning college credit, and advise those students to drop the course.

In order to be awarded college credit for EN140, the student must

  1. Earn an overall grade of “C” or higher for classroom work;
  2. Earn a score of at least “4” on each part of WP002.

WP002: The Written Expression Exit Examination

All students enrolled in dual-credit EN140 must take WP002. The examination is offered on the Saturday morning before the last week of classes of the Southeast semester; two make-up dates are available on the Tuesday and Wednesday of the last week of classes. Students must come to the Southeast campus or one of Southeast’s regional campuses to take WP002. The dual-credit WP002 examinations will be scored at the same time (usually the Monday and Tuesday of Southeast’s finals week) and in the same fashion as the regular WP002 exams.

Appeals

If a student receives a score of a minimum of 7.5 overall on both parts of WP002, the student can appeal the score. In order to appeal the score, the student must write a letter addressed to Dr. Missy Nieveen arguing that (and why) the exam deserves a higher score than it was originally given and requesting that the exam be scored again. The exam will be evaluated by two readers who did not originally score the exam; in the case of discrepancy, a third reader will score the exam

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