Bradley Phillips: Transition Spaces 16.3

Aug 30-Oct. 23, 2016
Opening Reception: Sept. 2, 4-8 p.m.
Artist Talk: Sept. 2, 6 p.m.

bradley phillips

Bradley Phillips
Detail of "Video Will Resume"

Bradley Phillips: Transition Spaces 16.3 opens Aug. 30, 2016 at Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Museum, inside Southeast Missouri State University’s River Campus.

The public is invited to view the exhibition beginning Aug. 30. An opening reception will be held 4-8 p.m. Sept. 2, with Bradley Phillips’ artist talk at 6 p.m.

The exhibit will remain on display through Oct. 23. Admission is free.

Bradley Phillips creates an interactive multimedia experience in the form of an audio/video installation titled “Video Will Resume” with material he collected between 2012 and 2015 from FaceTime screen shots and conversations between himself and his son.

Spectators and participants will experience the material as it is broken down into its own essential components; image, sound and time. This examination delves into the relationship between technology and virtual artifact, as the experience of the work becomes a simulacrum of the original “face to face” interaction. As such viewers will be compelled to encounter FaceTime as a contemporary form of communication in which its flaws remind us of its own inadequacy of the real. However, in contrast, FaceTime simultaneously functions as an advancement of a technology that connects people in ways never before possible and presents a beautiful juxtaposition against its inherent flaws.

Society has artistically fostered the development of new media as an approach to creation—what we experience within the digital age forms the basis for the evolution of cross-media approaches and practices. As a result all forms of digital content can be examined for inherent artistic value.

About the Artist

Bradley Phillips is Assistant Professor in the Department of Polytechnic Studies at Southeast Missouri State University. Phillips is also Multimedia Coordinator at Catapult Creative House, a creative arts incubator in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Phillips received his Master of Fine Arts in visual studies from University at Buffalo-State University of New York and his Bachelors in Professional Photography from Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara, California.

Phillips work has appeared in Creative Quarterly, The Big Muddy, The Cape Rock Review and the Cimarron Review. Bradley has exhibited his work nationwide, most notably at Art Space and CEPA Gallery in New York.

Phillips believes that new media challenges ‘traditional photography.’ He is certain, however, that the two can be harmonized. “Development and production of a work is only one side of photography as an art form. Seeking to expand the philosophy into the realm of the digital, the visual, the aural, and beyond, creates a comprehensive photography pedagogy that encompasses what has driven the field, and what is continuously developing. I feel that a more powerful connection between artist and camera may be drawn, empowerment to take control of creative expression,” Phillips says.

The Crisp Museum is located in the Cultural Arts Center at Southeast Missouri State University’s River Campus, located at 518 S. Fountain St. in Cape Girardeau, Mo. For more information, call (573) 651-2260 or email museum@semo.edu.

Artist Statement

It can be said that technological advances have paved the way for the development of contemporary culture. Artistically, these advances have fostered the development of new media as an approach to creation—what we experience within the digital age forms the basis for new modes of expression. For image-making, the advance of new media has, perhaps, challenged the traditional through the evolution of cross-media approaches and practices. While a foundational understanding of what constitutes traditional image-making is essential to the photography classroom, I believe that the emergence of new media should become an additional focus of the photography instructor: by reinforcing both common philosophy and currently developing theoretical approaches, the photography classroom may be better equipped to immerse students in a contemporary understanding.

Though some may consider the emergence of new media as a direct challenge to what has been continuously reinforced as ‘traditional photography’, I am certain that both approaches may be harmonized into a comprehensive mode of instruction. Historically, the relationship between artist and work may seem largely two-dimensional: the endeavor of creation primarily exists up until the moment the shutter is pressed. Once captured and printed, the ‘life’ of the artwork is presented to the viewer as complete. Our perception of such a notion leads to the idea of ‘point and shoot’—the simple consumption of the image as it exists or as it was planned.

For students just entering into the photographic realm, pre-visualization may constitute their only understanding of image-making. Undeniably, the very processes of traditional creation form the basis of what, historically and philosophically, photography is; however, I believe students should understand that, both artistically and theoretically, the lifespan of the image should extend beyond the physical printing. The advent of new media should stand to enhance a student’s understanding of the photographic process. To master the development and production of a work is only one side of photography as an art form—the other should seek to expand the philosophy into the realm of the digital, the visual, the aural, and beyond. A marriage between new media and the traditional creates a comprehensive photography pedagogy that encompasses what has driven the field, and what is continuously developing.

Foundationally, I believe a student’s immersion in photography should encompass the fundamentals of capturing and developing; however, pedagogically, I feel that students should become introduced to and instructed in what lies beyond the traditional. This ‘extended field’, which exists beyond the seemingly two-dimensional ‘wall decoration’, allows the photographic artist to dispel any traditional limitations. By extending the basis of the image beyond the act of printing, an interdisciplinary practice may be developed that investigates interactivity, time/movement/video, space, three-dimensionality, performance, and installation. Undoubtedly, students should be able to freely understand the power of the image to capture and express, but what lies beyond these preconceived notions? Creatively, and pedagogically, the possibilities are limitless. By allowing students to investigate the medium itself, I feel that a more powerful connection between artist and camera may be drawn—thus empowering developing artists to take control of their own creative expression.

Contact

573.651.2260
museum@semo.edu
River Campus, 175 Cultural Arts Center
Crisp Museum
One University Plaza, MS 7875
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701