Michael Faris: Transition Spaces 17.1

Michael Faris: Transition Spaces 17.1

August 25 - October 22 2017
Opening Reception: Friday September 1, 4-8 p.m.

Juried Exhibition 2016

 

"Michael Faris: Transition Spaces 17.1" opens Friday, Aug. 25, in the Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Museum at Southeast Missouri State University’s River Campus.

The public is invited to the opening reception 4-8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 1. The exhibit will remain on display through Oct. 22. Admission is free.

Dr. Faris chronicles actual events or fictional allegories that involve contemporary or historical people doing terrible things. His interests include combating violence, enforcing civil rights for everyone and working against concepts that create oppression or discrimination including racism, sexism and ageism.

“As long as there are bad people in the world, I will have plenty of subject matter for artwork for the next several hundred years,” Dr. Faris said.

Dr. Faris mainly creates oil paintings, drawings, sculptures and monoprints.

“Before I begin a work, I plan, sketch and rehearse the composition over and over in my mind for weeks, months and sometimes years,” he said. “I take photographs, print images from the Internet and arrange the subject matter in my mind before I begin. By the time I actually start the piece, the hard part is over.”

Dr. Faris earned his Ph.D. in art education at Indiana University, Bloomington (IUB). He earned his Master of Science in Education with an emphasis in art and Bachelor of Science in art education at Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (SIUE).

Dr. Faris has exhibited his work in locations throughout the Midwest including St. Louis, Missouri, Centralia, Illinois, Ullin, Illinois, Marion, Illinois, Harrisburg, Illinois, Carbondale, Illinois, Mt. Vernon, Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, and Herrin, Illinois.

The Crisp Museum is located in the Cultural Arts Center at Southeast Missouri State University’s River Campus, located at 518 S. Fountain St. in Cape Girardeau, Mo. For more information, call (573) 651-2260 or email museum@semo.edu.

Artist Statement by Dr. Michael Faris 
The subject matter of my artwork is generally called “art with a social agenda.” My works usually chronicle actual events or fictional allegories that involve contemporary or historical people doing terrible things. The human condition and human interaction are exceptionally interesting and awful. For me, I can’t imagine making artwork that has no humans in it. As long as there are bad people in the world, I will have plenty of subject matter for artwork for the next several hundred years. My specific interests are combatting violence (particularly violence against females and children), enforcing civil rights for everyone, and working against racism, sexism, ageism, or any other concept that creates oppression or discrimination.

I mainly make oil paintings, drawings, sculptures, and monoprints. The oil paintings are accomplished in a classic manner, with color underpainting followed by the finished product. I also work from the deep background toward myself while painting. This is the most expedient technique for me. The sculptures are usually mixed media pieces, often using found objects in conjunction with objects that I create. These works contain all sorts of materials and objects with various textures. The drawings are usually made with an erased graphite wash followed by a range of types of charcoal over the top. The graphite wash is erased so the charcoal can be used without graphite resistance. The graphite leaves a textured stain that I enhance with the charcoal. In addition to the graphite and charcoal, I use a whole collection of various types of Q-Tips, blending sticks, and four types of eraser to make the drawings. The monoprints are made with various types of software on the computer, printed onto prepared formats, and transferred to drawing paper. I usually work in black and white with these monoprints. 
Before I begin a work, I plan, I sketch, and I rehearse the composition over and over in my mind for weeks, months, and sometimes years. I take photographs, print images from the Internet, and arrange subject matter in my mind before I begin. By the time I actually start the piece, the hard part is over.

Artworks Online Page: 
http://www.michaelfarisart.com/

PBS episode of Expressions: 
http://www.pbs.org/video/2365675205/

Contact

573.651.2260
museum@semo.edu
River Campus, 175 Cultural Arts Center
Crisp Museum
One University Plaza, MS 7875
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701