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Southeast Missouri State University

Crystal Wagner: Transition Spaces 12.3

October 30, 2012-January 3, 2013
Wagner, Bio-Dome, detail view

“Crystal Wagner: Transition Spaces 12.3,” a printmaking and mixed-media installation titled Surface, will be displayed beginning October 30, 2012 in the Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Museum at Southeast Missouri State University’s River Campus. Wagner's exhibit is in conjunction with the Mid America Print Council Biannual Conference Pressing Prints/Pressing Palms: The Entrepreneurial Printmaker at Southeast Missouri State University. 

The public is invited to attend an opening reception from 4-8 p.m. on Friday, November 2. The exhibit will remain on display through January 3, 2013. Admission is free.

Through a combination of different processes including to but not limited to screen printing, intaglio etching, relief printmaking, drawing, intricately cut paper, collage, cable ties, paint, and mylar, tar paper; the exhibition takes advantage of the multiple in printmaking in constructing large intricate site-specific forms related to a concept. 

"I am interested in exploring the significance of waste as it relates to my interests. Printing on plastic bags, tablecloths, etc. and finding a way to repurpose the refuse of the current trends in our occupied, disposable approach at dealing with the world," Wagner says. "I am fascinated by the idea of environment. I rely completely on being a part of one but find more and more that I am being alienated from it. Environments form the complicated systems and structures that surround us.  On a visual level, they determine our sense of space, our understanding of form, and our sense of movement. In that way line, shape, color, and light, all synchronize and become the shifting backdrop that defines human begins and their relationship with the world. I appreciate the abstract and sometimes alien nature of that environment and in my own attempt at coming to terms with it, am working with what I call world building to construct specific habitats or landscapes within an environment."  

Wagner, Assistant Professor of Art at Georgia College and State University, earned a Bachelor of Fine Art at Atlanta College of Art and a Master of Fine Art at University of Tennessee.   

While in graduate school, Wagner wrote and self-published a book titled Crimson Sky. She has participated in numerous artist residencies. Her work has been accepted into numerous national juried exhibitions and has been exhibited both nationally and internationally. In April of 2008 and March of 2010, she was a featured emerging artist on Juxtapoz magazine’s website and in Summer, 2010 and Winter of 2012, she was featured on the cover of Graphic Impressions Magazine, SGCI.

The Crisp Museum is located in the Cultural Arts Center at Southeast Missouri State University’s River Campus, 518 S. Fountain St., Cape Girardeau, Mo. For more information, e-mail museum@semo.edu or call (573) 651-2260.

WebSite http://www.crystalwagner.com  

View Wagner's Curriculum Vitae

Crimson Sky on YouTube 
Crimson Sky is a novel written by Crystal Wagner that follows a young woman as she struggles to survive in Post-Apocalypic America after a nuclear holocaust onset by the irresponsible foreign policy of the Bush administration. It is a story about self-discovery and survival. It explores the human condition.

Artist Statement:
I am interested in the idea of 'science fiction' and consider its' meaning not as a fantastic explanation of what could be, but instead as it relates to what actually is. A world of understandings based on one proposed fictive interpretation after another. Never really yielding anything true or absolute In a way, humanities biological utility offers only an artificial rendition of what exists in the world instead of a concrete definition, and I find myself seduced by terms like; interpretation, artificial, abstraction, synthetic, and fabrication when I regard the complexity of it all.As I work to fabricate through drawings and materials what seem to be imagined spaces, forms; both sculptural and two dimensional, the micro/macro; the elements that make up my images operate like propositions in that they lend themselves to interpretation. As abstractions their executions reference schematic illustrations, scientific diagrams, and architectural models while being organic. I discover in the work that the imagined is just as relevant as the real and that during inception the work takes on validity through its fabrication, fiction or not.

I am interested in the intersections between synthetic and organic, real and unreal, abstract and concrete and in that way am intrigued by the forms and concepts associated with Utopia. It is during fabrication that the myriad of materials, that the imagery fuses together to create from many different components, one.

In my current body of work, I am fascinated by the idea of environment. I rely completely on being a part of one, but find more and more that I am being alienated from it. Environments form the complicated systems and structures that surround us.  On a visual level, they determine our sense of space, our understanding of form, and our sense of movement. In that way line, shape, color, and light, all synchronize and become the shifting backdrop that defines human begins and their relationship with the world. I appreciate the abstract and sometimes alien nature of that environment and in my own attempt at coming to terms with it, am working with what I call world-building to construct specific habitats within an environment. And even more, as the physical world that human beings exist in, becomes more and more removed from that environment due to their technologies, I can't help but to scrutinize the plastic plant, painted bright green, as a stand-in for something living, the neon light, or fluorescent streak, for something beautiful.  It is exciting for me to consider the variant matrix and multiple in printmaking and how it can lend itself to the construction of individual components. My formal approach is a combination of drawing, printmaking, collage, and sculpture, and I appreciate the idea of context as it relates to form. As individual components, the elements in the installation seem random, but through color, shape, quanity and context, they become integral parts of the world I build. And in world-building, my own environments become, fictive interpretations of turf, terrain, place.

WebSite Mid America Print Council 
The Mid America Print Council (MAPC) is an educational organization whose goal it is to promote awareness and appreciation of the art of making original prints, books, hand-made paper, and drawings. MAPC a resource to educational and non-profit organizations, universitites, and the public at large, providing for the exchange of technical and critical information on the art of printmaking. These goals are furthered through conferences and workshops; through the organization, display, and circulation of exhibitions of original prints, books, hand-made paper, and drawings; through newsletters, and journal articles; through awards given to those deserving special recongnition for lifetime contribution to printmaking; and through research, study, and general enjoyment of the arts.
 

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