Dr. Jeremy Heider, Associate Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator

Dr. Heider earned his Ph.D. in Social and Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Northern Illinois University in 2005. His research interests include implicit and explicit prejudice, the influence of stereotypes on social memory, sex differences in reactions to infidelity, and experimental variables that influence the validity of informed consent.

Courses taught:

  • PY 557 – Psychometrics
  • PY 561 – Advanced Social Psychology
  • PY 564 – Research & Practice in I-O and Social Psychology
  • PY 571 – Design & Analysis I
  • PY 657 – Psychology of Stereotyping & Prejudice
  • PY 696 – Thesis Research
  • PY 697 – Thesis Writing
  • PY 699 – Internship in I-O Psychology

Selected publications:

  • Edlund, J. E., Hartnett, J. L., Heider, J. D., Perez, E. J., & Lusk, J. (2014). Experimenter characteristics and word choice: Best practices when administering an informed consent. Ethics and Behavior, 24, 397-407.
  • Heider, J. D., Scherer, C. R., & Edlund, J. E. (2013). Cultural stereotypes and personal beliefs about individuals with dwarfism. Journal of Social Psychology, 153, 80-97.
  • Edlund, J. E., & Heider, J. D. (2008). The relationship between modern and implicit prejudice. In T. G. Morrison & M. A. Morrison (Eds.), The psychology of modern prejudice (pp. 77-92). New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • Heider, J. D., Scherer, C. R., Skowronski, J. J., Wood, S. E., Edlund, J. E., & Hartnett, J. L. (2007). Trait expectancies and stereotype expectancies have the same effect on person memory. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 43, 265-272.
  • Edlund, J. E., Heider, J. D., Scherer, C. R., Farc, M. M., & Sagarin, B. J. (2006). Sex differences in jealousy in response to actual infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 4, 462-470.

Dr. Stephen Nettelhorst, Assistant Professor

Dr. Nettelhorst earned his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Kansas State University in 2013. His research interests include human-computer interaction, cyberpsychology, online influence, online cognition, online behavior, media psychology, and consumer psychology.

Courses taught:

  • PY 526 – Consumer Psychology
  • PY 561 – Advanced Social Psychology
  • PY 571 – Design & Analysis I
  • PY 671 – Design & Analysis II

Selected publications:

  • Nettelhorst, S. C., Jeter, W. K., & Brannon, L. A. (2014). Be careful what you wish for: The impact of advertisement choice on viewers' expectations. Computers in Human Behavior, 41, 313-318.
  • Nettelhorst, S. C., Brannon, L. A., & Hill, W. T. (2013). Examining the impact of consumer feedback on internet product evaluation: Comparing base-rate and case history information. Computers in Human Behavior, 29, 1290-1294.
  • Nettelhorst, S. C., & Brannon, L. A. (2012). The effect of advertisement choice on attention. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 683-687.
  • Nettelhorst, S. C., & Youmans, R. J. (2012). The effects of advertisement variation and need for cognition on product attitudes over time. The New School Psychology Bulletin, 9, 68-73.

Dr. Alison Whiteford Damerall, Assistant Professor

Dr. Whiteford Damerall earned her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology with a concentration in Cognitive Neuroscience from Saint Louis University in 2013. Her research interests include language and memory, the cognitive demands of producing and understanding metaphoric language, embodied cognition, and the development of expertise in writing.

Courses taught:

  • PY 557 – Psychometrics
  • PY 571 – Design & Analysis I
  • PY 671 – Design & Analysis II

Selected publications:

  • Kellogg, R. T., & Whiteford, A. P. (2012). The development of writing expertise. In E. L. Grigorenko, et al. (Eds.), Writing: A mosaic of new perspectives (pp. 109-124). New York: Psychology Press.
  • Raulerson, B. I., Donovan, M. J., Whiteford, A. P., & Kellogg, R. T. (2010). Differential verbal, visual, and spatial working memory in written language production. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 110, 229-244.
  • Kellogg, R. T., Whiteford, A. P., & Quinlan, T. (2010). Does automated feedback help students learn to write? Journal Of Educational Computing Research, 42, 173-196.
  • Kellogg, R. T., & Whiteford, A. P. (2009). Training advanced writing skills: The case for deliberate practice. Educational Psychologist, 44, 250-266.

Dr. Nicolas Wilkins, Assistant Professor

Dr. Wilkins earned his Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from Kent State University in 2013. His research interests include cognitive skill acquisition, automaticity, and memory-based processing.

Courses taught:

  • PY 557 – Psychometrics
  • PY 571 – Design & Analysis I
  • PY 671 – Design & Analysis II

Selected publications:

  • Wilkins, N. J., & Rawson, K. A. (2013). Why does lag affect the durability of memory-based automaticity: Loss of memory strength or interference? Acta Psychologica, 144, 390-396.
  • Wilkins, N. J., & Rawson, K. A. (2011). Controlling retrieval during practice: Implications for memory-based theories of automaticity. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 208-221.
  • Wilkins, N. J., & Rawson, K. A. (2010). Loss of cognitive skill across delays: Constraints for theories of cognitive skill acquisition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 36, 1134-1149.
Return to M.A. in I/O Psychology page

Contact

573.651.2132
psychology@semo.edu
Scully 404
Department of Psychology
One University Plaza, MS 5700
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701