Southeast Missouri State University

Typing Instructions

  1. Type your information, or copy and paste your information, into the online submission form.
  2. Use Times New Roman 12pt type.
  3. Type the headings in italics, as shown below and add the appropriate information after each.
  4. Type authors in bold italics, using first name, middle initial if desired, and last name. If a faculty member is listed as a co-author, place an asterisk after the faculty member's name.

    For example:

    Authors: Dwayne Crites, Andrea Holloway, and Martha S. Zlokovich*

  5. Type title in bold, with all important words capitalized.
  6. Type major in normal typeface. If all authors have the same major, list it only once. If authors have different majors, list their majors in the same order as the authors are listed.
  7. Type course or department in which work was conducted in normal typeface.
  8. Type faculty sponsor title and name in normal typeface.
  9. Type abstract in normal typeface. The abstract should contain no more than 120 words.

Sample theoretical abstract to show style*

  • Authors: Jill Hernandez, Allen Smith, and Amanda Chang
  • Title: The Value of Historical Data in the Application of Interpretive Theories for Historical Archaeology
  • Majors: History
  • Course or department in which work was conducted: History
  • Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Steven Hoffman
  • Abstract: Historical archaeology, as a relatively young sub-discipline of archaeology, has borrowed it's interpretive theories and perspectives from the realms of prehistoric archaeology and social anthropology. The first part of this paper will examine several of these borrowed theories and the explanations they produce regarding past lifeways and behavior. Secondly, this paper will address the types of information historical data are able to yield in the interpretation of archaeology at a historic site. Lastly, the explanations for past behavior afforded by the borrowed theories will be compared to the answers historical data can provide to determine each theory's applicability for historical archaeology. The predictive nature of archaeology theory is readily applied to the prehistoric, but does the presence of historical data negate their application to historic periods.

Sample empirical abstract to show style*

  • Authors: Jill Hernandez, Allen Smith, Dwayne Crites, and Rickard Sebby*
  • Title: Relation of Religious Beliefs and Gender to Attitudes Toward Nontraditional Relationships
  • Majors: History, History, Psychology
  • Course or department in which work was conducted: Psychology, PY484
  • Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Rickard Sebby
  • Abstract: This study was concerned with discovering if different religious orientations, such as Fundamentalism, Orthodoxy, and Quest, related to acceptance of nontraditional (interracial and homosexual) relationships. Ninety-one university students, 44 males and 45 females, ranging in age from 17 to 42, participated for credit in a class. The participants were administered an Attitude Questionnaire (Sebby & Christopher, 1997), an Inventory of Religion (Sebby & Christopher, 1997), the Quest Scale (Altemeyer & Hunsberger, 1992), McFarland's (1989) Fundamentalism Scale, and the Christian Orthodoxy Scale (Hunsberger, 1989). Significant correlations (p < .05) indicated that individuals with a Fundamentalist orientation describe themselves as more religious than individuals with a Quest orientation. Individuals with a Quest orientation were more tolerant and accepting of individuals involved in homosexual relationships than were Fundamentalist or Orthodox individuals. No significant gender differences were obtained. The results of this research, however, are limited by the fact that all participants were college students at a Midwestern university and by the small sample size.

*these abstracts are shown as examples and do not list the actual authors or sponsors

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