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Southeast Missouri State University

Revised Fall 2010
FIELD EXPERIENCES OFFICE
(573) 651-2125

 

Table of Contents

      Welcome to Student Teaching

  1. Preliminary Information
    1. Purpose of Student Teaching
    2. MoStep Requirements
    3. Objectives of Student Teaching
    4. Approval for Student Teaching
    5. Student Teaching Application Process
  2. Policies and Procedures
    1. Student Teaching Placements
    2. Attendance
    3. Holding a Job/Taking Additional Classes
    4. Substituting
    5. Terminating Assignments
    6. Suspension of Students from Clinical Settings
    7. Modified Student Teaching
    8. What to do Before Reporting
    9. Role as Student Teacher
    10. General Suggestions for Success
    11. Praxis
    12. Courtesy Placements
    13. Work Progress Report
    14. Reflective Journal
    15. Grading
    16. Dress and Appearance
    17. Teacher Work Sample (TWS)
  3. Your First Week
  4. The Cooperating Teacher
    1. Role of the Cooperating Teacher
    2. Prepare for the Student Teacher's Arrival
    3. Orient the Student to the Classroom and School
    4. Provide Opportunities to Observe and Analyze
    5. Help Students Reflect on Teaching Choices
    6. Identifying New Challenges for the Student Teacher
    7. Evaluate the Student
  5. The University Supervisor
    1. Role of the University Supervisor
    2. Topics for Discussion during Semester Orientation
    3. Supervisor's Checklist

 

Welcome to Student Teaching!

Student teaching is the culminating experience in your preparation as a professional in the field of education.  This is your opportunity to apply what you have learned from Blocks I, II III, and some specialty Blocks.  This will be an intense experience so it is important that you should be able to devote all of your time and energy to this endeavor without other classes or work to distract you.  Your grade will not only be a reflection of your performance but will provide you an opportunity to develop professional relationships with your cooperating teacher and building principal and their recommendations will provide important information to prospective employers. 

This experience will provide you an opportunity to grow professionally by re-assessing your commitment to teaching, your knowledge/skills, values, attitudes and continuous reflection. 

Teaching is a rewarding profession. The rewards that count come to those who have a sincere interest in the students and their success. The College of Teacher Education at Southeast Missouri State University encourages each teacher education candidate to become a caring, competent, reflective teacher and life long learner who will incorporate new teaching strategies and strive to find ways that all students can learn. 

We want to encourage you to continue to improve your skills, look for better ways to teach and motivate students, and to take a special interest in your students. Much satisfaction is to be gained from working to help prepare students to make a living and succeed in life.  Don't hesitate to ask for assistance and counsel from your cooperating teacher, your supervisor, or the Office of Field Experiences. Asking for advice is not a sign of weakness; it is a sign of sensitivity and conscientiousness.

On behalf of the faculty and staff of the College of Education and the Office of Field Experiences we wish you a successful student teaching experience.  Have a rewarding career!

 


Tamela Randolph, Ph.D.                          Lori Mueller, Ed.D.
Interim Dean, College of Education           Coordinator for Clinical Experiences & Certificaton

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Preliminary Information

 


Purpose of Student Teaching

 

 

Student teaching is designed for a complete immersion into the profession. From the very first day at school Teacher Candidates are expected to become engaged, even in minor ways, in the work of teaching and they are expected to remain as fully engaged as possible until the very last day of student teaching.

The student teaching experience is intended to serve two basic purposes. One is for the prospective teacher to learn how to plan, coordinate, and teach in a classroom of diverse learners. Although it is the purpose of methods courses to provide the academic foundation for these actions, the actual application of principles of learning requires additional intense training. It should not be expected that individuals entering student teaching be fully prepared to assume responsibility for teaching. Rather, Student Teachers are considered to be “beginning teachers;" therefore, the assistance of and instruction from Master Teachers and University Supervisors is integral to their success.  Although earlier courses have required extensive hours in field experiences, it is during student teaching that they are able to take what they have learned in their coursework and “put it to the test” in the actual classroom.  For some Student Teachers, this transfer of learning is relatively easy; for others, the dissonance between the university learning and the realities of teaching can be quite difficult.  The supervisor who understands the knowledge base that the Student Teacher brings to student teaching can best assist in making this transition.

Student Teachers need a supportive, professional environment that serves as a model of excellence in order for them to best learn important skills that provide the foundation for their continued professional growth.

This culminating experience will be under the on-going guidance of University personnel in collaboration with the Cooperating Teacher at the host school. Commitment and initiative are essential. Student teaching will challenge one’s energy and ability. It is important to take advantage of the support of the host school, University Supervisor and former faculty when needed.  In addition, Teacher Candidates are encouraged to take advantage of professional development opportunities offered while in the school setting.

During the semester’s experience, Teacher Candidates are expected to apply current scientific research-based practices and tools, including technologies that enhance teaching and learning. At the same time, they are expected to exhibit and grow in traits such as cooperation, teaming, initiative, and leadership, all of which exhibit 21st century skills required for successful educators.  

 “Teacher-preparation programs should ensure that new teachers will master the content of the subjects they’ll teach and they will have well-supported field-based experiences embedded throughout their preparation programs.” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan

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Missouri Standards for Teacher Education Preparation

 

 

  • Understands concepts, tools of inquiry and structures of the discipline.

  • Understands how students learn and develop.

 

  1. Understands how students differ in approaches and adapts to diverse learners.

  2. Recognizes the importance of long range planning and curriculum development and develops implements and evaluates curriculum based upon student, district and state performance standards.

  3. Uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student’s development of critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills.

  4. Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning and self-motivation.

  5. The teacher candidate models effective verbal, nonverbal and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration and supportive interaction in the classroom.

  6. Understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner.

  7. The teacher candidate is a reflective practitioner who continually assesses the effects and actions on others.  This reflective practitioner actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally and utilizes the assessment and professional growth to generate more learning for more students.

  8. The teacher candidate fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents and educational partners in the larger community to support student learning and well being. The pre-service teacher understands the theory and application of technology in educational settings and has adequate technological skills to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students.

These standards are being addressed in the courses and field experiences of students now completing course requirements in the program.  A Teacher Work Sample is required to document evidence that the requirements have been met for the MOSTEP indicators that are appropriate at each block. 

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Objectives for Student Teaching

  1. To provide opportunities for the teacher candidate to integrate theory and practice and apply knowledge and skills to various teaching situations including the use of appropriate technology.
  2. To provide opportunities for teacher candidates to develop and sharpen skills of lesson planning and presentation, classroom management, and organization of learning activities to provide for individual needs of diverse student populations.
  3. To provide opportunities to observe closely experienced teachers and receive feedback on their own teaching performance from cooperating teachers and University supervisors.
  4. To acquire through observation and study, knowledge of school organization and develop through observation and practice professional attributes necessary in relating to colleagues, students, and parents.
  5. To help clarify the teacher candidate's philosophy of education and develop an appreciation of the importance of the teaching profession.
  6. To enhance University/school collaboration in promoting the profession and improving educational opportunities for students.
  7. To demonstrate and improve competencies included in the Missouri Standards for Teacher Education Preparation (MoStep).

The Student Teaching Experience consist of two diverse teaching placements providing a unique opportunity to broaden your level of experience with different district personnel and with students who may have a different perspective based upon ethnicity, socio-economic level, and disabilities.  By completing two diverse teaching placements you have the opportunity to demonstrate competencies in the areas of Instructional Process, Classroom Management, Interpersonal Relationships and Professional Responsibilities.  

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Approval for Student Teaching

After a student declares their major in teacher education the following criteria must be met prior to admission to admission to student teaching:

  1.  Admitted to the teacher education program.
  2.  Successfully completed Blocks I, II, III, and Specialty Blocks or Content Courses, if required, with a 2.5 GPA and “C or better” in all content  and professional education courses.  (These courses unique to your major can be found on your Degree Audit and/or advising sheets.)
  3. Teacher candidates must have all core curriculum courses, teaching specialty courses, and professional education courses completed before they will be permitted to student teach which includes EX390.  (Middle and Secondary only must enroll in EF400 (1 hour) as a part of Block IV.
  4. Complete student teaching application process online at http://cstl.semo.edu/studentteaching/spring2012.  (Please note: This site will be updated in the near future.)
  5. Presented evidence of having a negative tuberculosis test.
  6. Completed background check with fingerprinting. As a result of recent legislation (Statute 168.133, RSMo), anyone seeking a teaching certificate in Missouri after January 1, 2005, must possess an FBI Background Check that includes fingerprinting.  The FBI Background Check is also required by graduates who are applying for a teaching certificate. 

The FBI Background Check is current for one year.  The state of Missouri has contracted with IBT to manage fingerprinting electronically.  You will need to go to the company’s website, http://www.iisfingerprint.com, to schedule an appointment for fingerprinting.  It is your responsibility to maintain a copy of your clearance letter which is presented to the district upon request when beginning your student teaching experience in each placement.  A copy must also be forwarded to the Office of Field Experience before placement can be completed.

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Student Teaching Application Process

 

  • Formally apply for student teaching within the first three weeks of the semester prior to student teaching.  (Most students are enrolled in Block III coursework at this time.  If you are not enrolled in Block III courses, it is your responsibility to remain informed by checking periodically with your department and/or the Office of Field Experiences). 
  • Check for scheduled meetings for the sole purpose of applying to student teaching.  Dates and times are posted in Scully, on the third floor, and distributed through the departments across campus.  All meetings will be held during Common Hour with one evening meeting and ITV session will be conducted for students attending off campus sites.  An effort should be made to attend one of these sessions since delay could result in difficulty addressing your placement requests.  If there is a documented conflict in your class schedule and the scheduled meetings then you may contact the Office of Field Experiences at (573) 651-2125.  A trip to the office in Scully, Room 304, will be required prior to completing your placement.  If you attend an off campus facility alternative arrangements will be made.  All forms can be accessed and uploaded via the student teaching website at http://cstl.semo.edu/studentteaching/spring2012.  (Please note: This site will be updated in the near future.)

 


(Handwritten applications will not be accepted.  The entire process must be completed electronically since placement request must be submitted electronically per district requests.)

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Policies and Procedures

 

 

Student Teaching Placements

Student teaching placements are made in partnership schools that have agreed to identify Cooperating Teachers that meet the criteria as Master teachers which means they must have at least three years of experience and ne year experience in present district prior to placement. 

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Attendance

Attendance is critical!  Teacher Candidates are expected to report regularly and on time every day for the entire assignment of each eight week experience. The calendar of the host district will be followed with the exception of University Orientation held on the first day of the semester and required seminars if enrolled in EF400 which is required for Middle/Secondary majors only.  Gaining teaching experience can only be done through the experience of teaching and failure to meet your daily obligations will adversely affect the final grade.  Only in cases of serious illness are student teachers to be absent from their placements.  In the event of illness, he/she should notify their University Supervisor and district supervisor of their illness.  In addition, in cases of emergencies, accidents, etc. a delay may occur but notification is imperative to University and district supervisors. 

Excessive absenteeism will impact final grade!  Any time a student misses more than 3 days of student teaching for any reason, a review is made by the district supervisor, University Supervisor, Director of Field Experiences and Certification Director to assess the impact upon certification requirements.  Time must be made up by teaching the appropriate number of additional days after the close of the student teaching period.  (Course credit will be withheld until documentation is given that time was appropriately made up.) 


Vacations:  There are no vacation or personal days during the semester when student teaching is being completed other than those holidays recognized by the host district.  Your attendance is required when host district is in session. 


School Closings:  In the event that schools are closed for an extended period due to emergency that impacts physical facilities or weather related the University Supervisor with the assistance of the Director of Field Experiences will secure another placement either temporarily or permanently dependent upon the unique circumstances.  It is important that contact be made to the University Supervisor and/or Director of Field Experiences as soon as you are aware of this type of situation.  If districts are closed for several days it may require the calendar to be adjusted in order to complete requirements for program completion and certification. 

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Holding a Job/Taking Additional Classes

The course load during student teaching represent a full academic work load and full or part-time work is strongly discouraged.  Teacher candidates often spend 50+ hour work weeks during student teaching.  If it is determined that additional responsibilities are interfering with their student teaching performance in extreme cases they may be asked to drop student teaching.

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Substituting

Teacher candidates are not certified as substitute teachers and not legally qualified to substitute for an absent teacher.  However, students certainly should not argue with school officials, who may be faced with an emergency necessitating temporary assistance. Nevertheless, a student who is asked to substitute could respectfully point out the University policy in this regard, while perhaps suggesting the use of the cooperating teacher as a substitute, with the teacher candidate remaining in the room where he/she is known and at ease with the students.  It is the district’s decision if they wish to use a teacher candidate to fill in for their cooperating teachers for absences of brief (a day or two) duration, if another teacher in the building is designated by the principal as someone to contact in time of need.  The teacher candidate, the cooperating teacher, and the designated teacher should all be aware of this.

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Terminating Assignments

Schools reserve the right to refuse assignment of any student and the right to terminate a student's placement for cause.  An informal hearing including consultation with the Director of Field Experiences, the University supervisor, the teacher candidate, and a representative of the school will precede termination.  Causes for termination may include inappropriate language, dress, behavior, breaches of school district policy, illegal activity on the part of the teacher candidate, and inability to perform duties required of a teacher candidate, etc.

After termination, a hearing will be held, if requested in writing by the student, to determine the appropriateness of placement in another district.  The University reserves the right to delay future enrollment in student teaching until such time that the grounds for termination are no longer relevant.  If placement poses a threat to the orderly educational process of a school it may be denied.  A teacher candidate who leaves an assignment before the ending date without consultation and approval of the Director of Field Experiences will be dropped from that half pending an appeal process.  If grades must be posted prior to rendering a final decision then a Grade or “Incomplete (I)” will be assigned until a final decision is made. 

Further policy procedures have been adopted and approved by the University that impact the removal of teacher candidates from their assignments.


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Suspension of Students from Clinical Settings

The Field Experience/Clinical Director is given the authority to suspend students from the clinical setting for the causes set out herein.  Actions shall be taken when, in the judgment of the Director, the best interest of the University and the cooperating clinical site will be served by immediate suspension of the student from clinical experience.  Prior to, or within five business days immediately following the suspension, the student will be notified in writing of the reason or reasons for suspension and will be given an opportunity to confer with the Director to present any reasons the suspension should not take place or be continued.  If, at such conference, the Director decides the student should be suspended, or, if suspension has already occurred or continued, the student shall have five business days thereafter to appeal the decision of the Director to the Dean for the College of  Education.  If an appeal is filed, a hearing by the Dean will be held within five business days.  The Dean will render a decision within five business days after the hearing, or within such other time as may be mutually agreed.  The decision of the Dean shall be a final decision.


Students in a clinical setting may be suspended from a placement in a private or public setting for one or more of the following causes:

  • Violation of State laws. 
  • Violation of University policies, regulations or directives 
  • Violation of policies, regulation or directives of the party providing the clinical experience. 
  • Physical or mental condition making the student unfit to instruct or associate with clients, patients, children or youth. 
  • Immoral conduct or unethical behavior. 
  • Incompetence, inefficiency, insubordination or other performance deficiencies while assuming the duties involved in the clinical experience. 
  • Excessive or unreasonable absence from attendance in the clinical setting. 
  • Charges or conviction of a felony or crime involving moral turpitude. 
  • Charges or conviction of child abuse or neglect. Failure to maintain academic standards or progress required for graduation.
  • Any cause which would prevent licensing (or suspension of license) in the profession for which the student is preparing.

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Modified Student Teaching

The Student Teaching experience may be modified based upon a ruling by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Programs with pre-service education students who are concurrently employed in public or accredited nonpublic schools for at least two years as teacher assistants/paraprofessional shall accept such experiences in lieu of the conventional student teaching requirement if the following conditions are met:

  1. The preservice student’s experience as a teacher assistant was concurrent with the student’s participation in the professional education program and in the same content area and grade range for which the student is seeking certification,
  2. The teacher assistant shall have conducted teaching activities comparable to those required for other preservice education students in conventional student teaching placements and demonstrating similar competencies.
  3. The teacher with whom the teacher assistant served meets the qualifications for a cooperating teacher, as defined in this rule;
  4. The teacher with whom the teacher assistant served has been provided training for observing and evaluating the assistant’s teaching practice through the institution providing the assistant’s professional education program or through the school or district’s mentor training program; and 
  5. The teacher assistant has been working with permission and under the authority of the principal of the school or a designee.
  6. Letters of support must be received from the building principal and prospective Cooperating Teacher prior to placement decision being made.  The letters should indicate that the teacher assistance has had a range of responsibilities planning and implementing instructional activities.

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What to do Before Reporting

Before you report to your school you must attend an orientation session, to be led by the Office of Field Experiences, which is announced in your assignment materials.

Well before you report for student teaching and after you receive your placement letter, you should contact the district where you have been assigned and request to speak to the principal's office and ask the secretary if you may arrange a time to meet with your cooperating teacher and if possible the principal.  This is an opportunity to confirm the time, date, and place where you should report.  You should learn their names and the names of the office secretary including the correct spelling and pronunciation.  Remember it is inappropriate to refer to individuals by their first names.  Within the school setting use titles such as Dr., Mr., Mrs., or Ms. and their last names. 

Keep in mind that first impressions are important.  Many school administrators promote teacher candidates working in their building.   Having a teacher candidate work in the classroom gives the administrator an opportunity to observe that person and determine if the teacher candidate merits consideration for future employment.  First impression may solidify or eliminate you as a candidate for a position.

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Role as Student Teacher

The student teacher is placed as a learner with a cooperating teacher in the classroom setting. Students should utilize course work knowledge, the expertise of the cooperating teacher, and the actual classroom experience to gain knowledge and skills needed to teach. Student teaching may be viewed as a partnership in teaching. Student teachers can experience and evaluate various values and beliefs about the profession when they assume the role of a partner and co-teacher with the cooperating teacher.

Since a teacher's role includes assignments in addition to teaching, you should inquire to what extent your supervisor will expect you to be present during such extra duties as playground observation, lunch supervision, study hall supervision, extra-curricular sponsorship, teachers' meetings, etc.  Certainly, any of these duties which involve the students in your academic classes would further your understanding of them and would be profitable to you in your relationship with them.  It is desirable to be positive and eager in establishing your position concerning extra duties, rather than waiting to be told.  Ask, and your supervisor will be grateful and understanding, as well as appreciative of your professionalism.

Schools are respectfully cautioned that you should not be exploited in these duties.  Further, try to avoid being put in the position of carrying out duties without supervision or the assistance of your supervising teacher.  You should not be expected to sponsor or chaperone groups on your own.  It should be unnecessary to add that you should exercise complete discretion regarding any personal relationships with students during informal extra-curricular activities.  Teacher candidates may not escort or be escorted by pupils from the schools in which they are student teaching; such conduct might be cause for termination from the assignment or the program.

Student teaching requires considerable time for planning and preparing, particularly as the semester progresses and more teaching responsibilities are given to you.  It is in your best interest to use your school planning time carefully and wisely, since it affords you an opportunity to discuss your plans with your Cooperating Teacher and others who may have assist with instruction.  Planning should and almost certainly will involve working at night away from the school.  It would be a rare teacher candidate who could successfully teach the entire period without spending a significant amount of time after school hours and on weekends in preparing for the tasks immediately at hand.  If adequate planning has not occurred it will be obvious and will jeopardize the success of your students and jeopardize your assignment.  (Advice:  Over-plan, rather than under-plan and wonder what to do for the next thirty minutes!)

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General Suggestions for Success

Student teaching is a "full-time" job and should be treated as a professional work experience. The cooperating teacher will expect full commitment. Part-time jobs, social engagements, or course work should be reduced or avoided if possible.

 

  • Develop a receptive attitude toward feedback from your cooperating teacher and university supervisor. This feedback is essential for your growth as a professional.
  • Keep communication lines open. Your cooperating teacher and university supervisor are there to help you in any way that they can. Ask for their advice and suggestions.
  • Most student teacher-cooperating teacher relationships are warm and supportive. But if communication problems develop with your cooperating teacher, talk to your supervisor immediately. Remember that many supervisors view themselves as advocates for their student teachers.
  • Take time to discuss performance expectations with your cooperating teacher and university supervisor, especially at the start of the experience.
  • Follow your cooperating teacher's lead in the daily hours spent at school.
  • As you begin student teaching, look for ways to become involved from the very first day and expect to give more assistance than you receive. Volunteer special assistance for individual students or small groups, with playground duty, with clubs, and other co-curricular activities.
  • Daily attendance at school, barring emergencies, is required. Report absence to the school, the cooperating teacher, and the university supervisor. Attend all required meetings. Faculty meetings, grade level meetings, and others involving your cooperating teacher are "musts."
  • Get to know support staff, including secretaries, custodians, and resource people such as school counselors and IMC directors.
  • Ask your principal to observe your teaching or to conduct a mock interview.
  • Determine what is considered appropriate dress in your particular school and look the part of a professional. Consider that certain informalities in dress may be a privilege of regular faculty members and not applicable to a student teacher.
  • Give yourself some quiet time at the end of each day to reflect on the day's activities.

 

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Praxis

You are reminded that you will need to take a national test (Praxis) for certification.  The College of Education encourages teacher candidates to complete the Praxis requirement prior to student teaching.  Application can be made online through ETS.   During your final semester, you should complete an application for certification that will be mailed to you by the certification office in Scully 3089 when you are placed on the graduation list.  Effective August 1, 2000, criminal background checks, including fingerprints, will be administered prior to certification in Missouri.  These rules may be accessed through the following DESE website (http://www.dese.mo.gov/

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Courtesy Placements

Teacher candidates may not be placed outside the University service area unless a hardship exists.  Should approval be granted to complete student teaching outside of the service area, it is the teacher candidate’s responsibility to secure a four year institution with an accredited program in teacher education within the area of certification willing to provide a supervisor for their experience which will include making monetary arrangements with them.  Fees for supervision must be paid directly to them and in addition all course tuition and associated fees are due to Southeast Missouri State University since this institution is granting the degree and certification.  Those wishing to apply to do student teaching out of the area must send a formal letter of request to the Office of Field Experiences so eligibility can be determined. 

All Formative, Summative and Disposition forms used by the College of Education must be used by the Cooperating Teacher and Courtesy Supervisor and a letter grade will be assigned by your Supervisor.   In addition, they must meet the same criteria to serve as Cooperating Teacher and Supervisor that is required by Southeast Missouri State University.

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Work Progress Report

The Work Progress Report serves two purposes: (1) it provides a record of time spent completing student teaching which enables the University to justify granting course credit, and (2) it helps the Office of Certification maintain information which may be important towards certification requirements in other states.  (Some states, for example, require statements of total hours spent in certain student teaching activities. The progress report must be submitted to the University supervisor for review weekly and on the last visit submitted as part of your final paperwork.  Since this is part of your course requirements and recordkeeping is a significant part of teaching, failure to submit may negatively impact your final grade.
This form is available online and must be kept up-to-date. You are asked to enter the amount of time you spend observing, participating, teaching, etc. each week of student teaching to the nearest half hour the amount of time in each of the 6 activities listed on the page.  For example, although the students are in class about 6 hours, you will arrive before that and may use some time at lunch and after school for planning and/or you may assist with bus duty, attend a school function which may include professional development activities.  This could give you a total of more than forty hours per week.  No certain amount over the minimum is required, but forms that show the minimum will be rare for those who have a successful teaching experience.  The form explains what activities should be included in the various categories of observing, teaching, etc. In addition, any days absent should also be recorded.

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Reflective Journal

Teacher candidates should keep a reflective journal for each experience with entries at least once a week.  Items in the journal may include lessons which went especially well and what you think made it happen, lessons which did not go well, and how you can improve them; how discipline problems were handled, and other items of reflection on your experience.  Other items which you may want to address:  I'm going to improve my teaching performance by ...   or The most important learning experience this week was ...   or What would you change in your plans if you taught the same lesson again?

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Grading

The basis for evaluation of the first half of student teaching is quality and consistency of demonstration of the teaching competencies as reflected in the formative and summative performance assessments, and satisfactory completion of course assignment seminars and readings (e.g. unit plans, lesson plans, etc.).  The following marking system may be used as a guideline for the first half of Block IV:  (Please refer to the evaluation form in the appendix.)

  1. An "A" grade represents a superior level of competence in all areas and is viewed in consideration of all ratings and recommendations as representing an exceptional student teaching performance.  It should be supported by ratings and comments.  A student need not be perfect to receive an "A", but an "A" should represent top performance and notable effectiveness. All areas should be rated in the Meets column on the summative evaluation form.
  2. A grade of "B" indicates expected level of competence. This grade would be reflected if one summative rating is in the Not Yet Meets column, but all other ratings are in the Meets column.  The over-all grade is not determined solely by ratings when circumstances and notations warrant a different grade. Factors considered in those circumstances may include rapport with students, classroom control, preparation, and professional behavior, knowledge of subject matter and teaching skills, attendance, creativity, and recommendations of the cooperating teacher.  The "B" should be viewed as a good grade.
  3. A "C" indicates that most criteria are in the Meets column with few in the Not Meets column and none in the Insufficient Evidence column.  If circumstances warrant a grade different than "C", when most criteria are acceptable, then notation on the summative form should indicate reasons for the grade adjustment. Factors such as professional conduct, effort, attendance, knowledge of subject matter and teaching skill, and cooperating teacher recommendation may be considered.  A grade of "C" means that the experience is acceptable and does not have to be repeated to get credit for student teaching.
  4. A "D" indicates that a number of areas are below expectations on the criteria of the MOSTEP student teaching evaluation model.  This grade would be reflected by markings at the Not Yet Meets and/or Insufficient Evidence on the summative evaluation form. This grade may reflect lack of effort and preparation, obvious lack of knowledge of subject matter and teaching skill, excessive absences, or unprofessional behavior.  This grade may also reflect that the teacher candidate did not make any effort to meet the criteria on the portfolio that were specifically monitored by the teacher candidate supervisors in the Block IV field. The experience must be repeated since all professional education grades must be "C" or above for graduation.


Overall, grades are not determined solely by ratings on the formative/summative evaluations.  In unusual circumstances, and when notations on the evaluation forms justify it, a grade may be given which is slightly different from that which a majority of a particular number of ratings might suggest.  However, comments in regard to knowledge, skill, effort, and performance should justify a higher or lower grade than what the ratings imply.  Lack of completion and submission of all required documentation for each experience  and/or excessive absentism may impact final grade in either or both eight week experiences.  

Grading for the second eight week experience half follows the same policies as the first eight weeks.  A level of competence which warrants an "A" on the first half may not warrant an "A" in the second half if a level of competence is not sufficiently demonstrated.

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Dress and Appearance

Students are required to complete a teacher work sample (TWS) that employs a range of strategies and builds on each student’s strengths, needs, and prior experiences.  Many reading this summary will recognize the TWS as a unit plan, but a unit plan that is more detailed in guiding instruction for all the diversity captured in a classroom of students.  Through this performance assessment, teacher candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate learning by meeting the following TWS standards.

  1. The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment.
  2. The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning goals.
  3. The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during, and after instruction.
  4. The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.
  5. The teacher uses regular and systematic evaluations of student learning to make instructional decisions.
  6. The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.
  7. The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

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Teacher Work Sample (TWS)

Students are required to complete a teacher work sample (TWS) that employs a range of strategies and builds on each student’s strengths, needs, and prior experiences.  Many reading this summary will recognize the TWS as a unit plan, but a unit plan that is more detailed in guiding instruction for all the diversity captured in a classroom of students.  Through this performance assessment, teacher candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate learning by meeting the following TWS standards.

  1. The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment.
  2. The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning goals.
  3. The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during, and after instruction.
  4. The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.
  5. The teacher uses regular and systematic evaluations of student learning to make instructional decisions.
  6. The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.
  7. The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

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Your First Week

Be prompt and go immediately to your workstation daily.  Your cooperating teacher has been encouraged to help you get acquainted and oriented.  They have been requested to provide a table or desk and a shelf or file drawer for you to use.  If there is minimal physical space, make adaptations.  Some classrooms or buildings will have ample accommodations for you and some will have less. Whether you are first half or second half, cooperating teachers have been asked to let you observe for a day or two.  Observation does not mean that you do not interact.  It may mean you listen, observe, and make notes of students who have special needs, learn names of students, work on a bulletin board, check spelling, math, or some objective tests, check out audio visual equipment, review text books, etc.  Your Cooperating Teacher will indicate their expectations of your responsibilities on a weekly or daily basis in the classroom.  Durring the beggining of each placement you will need to be given some time to study the curriculum and plan and gradually team teach, or assist, before you assume responsibility for a small part of the day. 

Your University supervisor will visit during the first week.  He/she will visit with you and the teacher to get acquainted and answer any questions you or the teacher may have.

Since a teacher's role includes assignments in addition to teaching, you should inquire to what extent your supervisor will expect you to be present during such extra duties as playground observation, lunch supervision, study hall supervision, extra-curricular sponsorship, teachers' meetings, etc.  Certainly, any of these duties which involve the students in your academic classes would further your understanding of them and would be profitable to you in your relationship with them.  It is desirable to be positive and eager in establishing your position concerning extra duties, rather than waiting to be told.  Ask, and your supervisor will be grateful and understanding, as well as appreciative of your professionalism.

Schools are respectfully cautioned that you should not be exploited in these duties.  Further, try to avoid being put in the position of carrying out duties without supervision or the assistance of your supervising teacher.  You should not be expected to sponsor or chaperone groups on your own.  It should be unnecessary to add that you should exercise complete discretion regarding any personal relationships with students during informal extra-curricular activities.  Teacher candidates may not escort or be escorted by pupils from the schools in which they are student teaching; such conduct might be cause for termination from the assignment or the program.

Student teaching requires considerable time for planning and preparing, particularly as the semester progresses and more teaching responsibilities are given to you.  It is in your best interest to use your school planning time carefully and wisely, since it affords you an opportunity to discuss your plans with your Cooperating Teacher and others who may have assist with instruction.  Planning should and almost certainly will involve working at night away from the school.  It would be a rare teacher candidate who could successfully teach the entire period without spending a significant amount of time after school hours and on weekends in preparing for the tasks immediately at hand.  If adequate planning has not occurred it will be obvious and will jeopardize the success of your students and jeopardize your assignment.  (Good advice:  Over-plan, rather than under-plan and wonder what to do for the next thirty minutes!)

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The Cooperating Teacher

 

 

Role of the Cooperating Teacher

As the person who will work most closely with the student, the cooperating teacher plays a key role in the student teaching experience and undoubtedly has the most immediate impact upon each individual student; it is often said that “we teach as we were taught.” 

Student teaching may be viewed as a partnership in teaching. Student teachers have the opportunity to experience and evaluate various values and beliefs about the profession when they participate as partners and co-teachers with the cooperating teacher.

Student teaching also marks the beginning of a critical transition from student to professional during their final professional clinical based experience. The cooperating teacher models professional behavior for the student and guides the teacher candidate toward a deeper understanding of school cultures.

Each student teacher brings to the experience a unique combination of teaching characteristics and skills. Therefore, the goal of the student teaching experience is to provide the student with maximum opportunity to perform to the degree that personal interest, abilities, and individuality will allow. Students who experience a high degree of involvement in teaching and other school-related activities report a successful student teaching experience.

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Prepare for the Student Teacher's Arrival

Prepare pupils in advance for the arrival of the student teacher. It may be useful to begin to establish the concept of two teachers in the classroom and thus help pupils anticipate the student teacher's contributions. Plan to provide the student teacher with a desk or work space if possible.

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Orient the Student to the Classroom and School


Very early in the experience cooperating teachers should discuss the following with the student teacher:

  • expectations for the student teaching experience regarding classroom schedule, daily routines, and procedures 
  • a communication plan for regular discussion and how the student teacher may be involved in decision-making, as well as, parental involvement in school affairs
  • the school's organizational structure, school policies such as emergency procedures, harassment policies, and curriculum, Internet restrictions, and cell phone usage , 
  • personal philosophies of teaching and personal/professional backgrounds of the cooperating teacher and student teacher 
  • curriculum content and materials 
  • individual pupils, particularly those having special needs 
  • record-keeping responsibilities especially as related to assessment/evaluations of students. 
  • Providing access to texts, curriculum guides and classroom/school resources
  • Delineating student teacher responsibilities and discussing expectations for phasing-in student teacher to accept more classroom responsibilities
  • Reviewing and discussing lesson plans on a continual basis
  • Discussing instructional plans, relationship of content decisions, teacher methods and student learning

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Provide Opportunities to Observe and Analyze

The cooperating teacher typically gives the student teacher a variety of classroom episodes to observe, analyze, and discuss. This on-the-spot observation of an experienced teacher handling a class in a variety of situations is invaluable to the student.  Additionally, the student teacher needs the assurance that you are available for help, especially initially as they begin to assume responsibilities.  Student Teachers and Cooperating Teachers should engage in daily informal conversations designed to assist and support the student teacher.  Lengthier conferences (suggest at least once a week) should also take place that promote reflection of overall performance and professional growth.  

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Help Students Reflect on Teaching Choices


Student teachers are being prepared for a career in teaching, so it imperative they must learn how to function effectively in the student teaching environment as well as be prepared to be effective in a variety of classroom and school situations. For this reason it is critical for the cooperating teacher to discuss with the student teacher why particular choices were made and others rejected about curriculum, classroom management, etc. In this way the student teacher will better understand the motives and rationales underlying particular choices. Since many policies and procedures were in place prior to their arrival understanding the "history" of the classroom and school will help student teachers make their own decisions in the future, when the school and classroom environment may be very different.

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Identify New Challenges for the Student Teacher


Many student teachers are very effective in the classroom, particularly those with substantial practicum or even previous instructional experience. While recognizing their student's skills, cooperating teachers can help these student teachers by identifying new challenges e.g., encouraging them to try different classroom management techniques, work with particular students, teach a less familiar content area or topic, or experiment with new instructional approaches. Student teachers have often been successful by staying within their strengths and "comfort zones." Cooperating teachers who push student teachers outside those "comfort zones" offer valuable opportunities for growth and reflection.

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Evaluate the Student Teacher

Student teachers need regular communication and feedback from their cooperating teacher. Students feel reassured when they know there will be regular opportunities for them to discuss their progress. For this reason it should be a high priority to establish methods and times for communicating early in the experience. It is also recommended that the cooperating teacher participate in as many of the post-observation conferences with the student teacher and supervisor as time will allow.  It is critical that the cooperating teacher share any concerns about the student teacher as early in the placement as possible with the University supervisor or the Director of Field Experiences if it is determined needed.

Near the conclusion of the experience the cooperating teacher will be asked to complete a formal, written Summative evaluation of the student's performance in collaboration with the University supervisor.  All evaluations become a part of the student's permanent record in the College of Education.  Although the University supervisor has the responsibility for the final evaluation of the student teacher, this is usually determined through consultation with the university supervisor and cooperating teacher.

We appreciate the responsibility the Cooperating Teachers assume and their support of the Teacher Education program at Southeast Missouri State. 

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The University Supervisor

 

 

Role of the University Supervisor

The student teaching supervisor is an official representative of the University who assumes responsibility for directly supervising student teachers and serving as liaison between the School of Education and cooperating schools.  Many have taught and/or served not only as classroom teachers, but as administrators for a number of years in the public schools with a variety of experiences.
The University supervisor is expected to:

  • Attend meetings and functions related to student teaching as scheduled each semester. 
  • Serve as a personal resource to guide the student teacher in all aspects of the experience including professional and interpersonal issues. 
  • Address problems or concerns immediately through open dialogue with the student teacher, cooperating teacher, and/or Director of Field Experiences
  • Arrange an initial meeting within first two weeks of semester with the Cooperating Teacher and student teacher to review the expectations and requirements that facilitate an effective working relationship.  The supervisor may wish to exchange information with the cooperating teacher regarding professional backgrounds; clarify expectations regarding lesson plans and other student teacher responsibilities; review procedures for the student's induction into teaching; discuss observation procedures such as feedback to the student teacher, conference times, etc.; and develop a plan for future visits.    In addition, the Power Point presentation regarding the responsibilities of the Cooperating Teacher must be reviewed and documented. 
  • Conduct formal teaching observations and post-observation conferences with the student teacher which can be categorized as orientation, observation and evaluation.  Some visits will be concerned with the observation of the student's teaching while others will focus on setting goals for the semester and evaluating the student's progress.  In addition, conferences should be scheduled with the Cooperating Teacher to review the strengths and any concerns regarding the performance of the candidate.  The number of university supervisor visits may vary according to student teacher need and program expectations.
  • The supervisor should take notes during each observation and give a copy of these to the student teacher and cooperating teacher. A team emphasis should be stressed throughout the semester, with the cooperating teacher, student teacher, and supervisor maintaining a close working relationship.  Guidelines for discussion may include what the student teacher has done, demonstrated strengths, lesson planning, identify areas of concern and develop an action plan if wanted.
  • Complete and share written observation reports during the visits.  Student teachers invariably want to be evaluated.  They want assistance in their teaching and seek direction from their cooperating teacher and supervisor.   They need specific feedback, followed by an opportunity to concentrate on a given set of recommendations, followed in turn by a conference to discuss progress.  At times, three-way conferences may be needed, for purposes of clarification or just to make sure that all are in agreement concerning expressed needs for growth or improvement.  University Supervisors join with cooperating teachers in evaluating performance and have the responsibility of assigning grades based on their observations and input from cooperating teachers.
  • All University forms must be completed and submitted.  During the transition frm Foliotek to Chalk and Wire, some student evluations must be completed on paper and others electronically.  Either way, all must be completed and submitted prior to the end of the semester.

The responsibility to the University Supervisor consists of communicating frequently and candidly and report any concerns.  Furthermore, evaluation should be collaboratively completed including the Summative evaluation and the Disposition to support growth and development of the student teacher. 

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Some Topics for Discussion during Each Semester Orientation

  • Absences:  All absences must be made up.   (Emphasize to students.) “It is your responsibility to notify your cooperating teacher and supervisor that you are going to be absent.  Follow the procedures they have given you regarding notification of absences and make-up days.  Absences must be recorded on the work progress report.”
  • Contact second half cooperating teacher for second half immediately and again by 4th week
  • Review work progress report.  A report is completed for eight week experience.  Dates must be placed on each column for each week or part of a week and all missed days documented
  • Written Lesson plans and classroom management procedures will be addressed during each visit.  Stress to students that they must fill out a lesson plan for each formal lesson they present. This lesson plan will serve as an outline for the pre-conference discussion. The Cooperating Teacher may have requirements for lesson plans unique to the district requirements.  Learn procedures of the class as established by the cooperating teacher.  Present a confident demeanor.  Focus on learning and keeping students on task.
  • Dress and grooming.  Students are expected to follow policies of the assigned school district.
  • Grading.  Emphasize that an A is not automatic.  Refer to the handbook for grading procedures.  Remind student teachers they must successfully complete their portfolio requirements during their student teaching block.
  • Relationship with cooperating teachers and principals.  Remind student teacher they are guests in the building.  They need to familiarize themselves with the policies of the district and adhere strictly to those policies.
  • Relationships with students.  It is important to maintain a professional relationship at all times.  Any concerns regarding abuse and harassment should be discussed immediately with your Cooperating Teacher. 
  • Relationship with supervisors.  Students should expect to receive constructive criticism. 
  • Folders to give cooperating teachers contain evaluation forms, pre-observation worksheet, payroll card and data sheet.  Students must give the folder to the cooperating teacher.  (We ask that the cooperating teacher have the data sheet and payroll card ready when supervisor makes first visit.)
  • Confidentiality.
  • Review all evaluation forms (Formative, Summative and Disposition).

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SUPERVISOR’S Checklist
(Within 5 or 6 school days of start date)

First Visit

  1. Touch base with office.  Introduce yourself to secretary and principal, if possible.
  2. Announce second visit to teacher and student teacher for first evaluation.
  3. Get Personal Data Sheet and Payroll Stipend Card (blue card) from teacher.
  4. Exchange contact information.
  5. Some may have contact with more than one teacher.  Discuss potential areas for misunderstanding.
  6. Review PowerPoint
  7. Ask if teacher has questions about evaluations.
  8. Pick up daily schedule of teacher showing conference periods.

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