Overview

Sexual Assault is a term to describe any sexual act without consent. Missouri Law divides these acts into separate offenses, ranging from Forcible Rape to 3rd Degree Sexual Misconduct.

Sexual Assault does not happen due to uncontrollable lust or simple miscommunication, though these acts are often written off as such. Sexual Assaults are acts of aggression for which there is no excuse. No matter how a person is dressed, or behaves, no one asks or deserves to be assaulted.

Laws

Below are listed the Missouri Legal definitions of the various crimes that are often referred to as Sexual Assault.

Forcible Rape: A person commits the crime of forcible rape if such person has sexual intercourse with another person by the use of forcible compulsion. Forcible compulsion includes the use of a substance administered without a victim's knowledge or consent which renders the victim physically or mentally impaired so as to be incapable of making an informed consent to sexual intercourse.

Sexual Assault: A person commits the crime of sexual assault if he has sexual intercourse with another person knowing that he does so without that person’s consent.

Forcible Sodomy: A person commits the crime of forcible sodomy if such person has deviate sexual intercourse with another person by the use of forcible compulsion. Forcible compulsion includes the use of a substance administered without a victim's knowledge or consent which renders the victim physically or mentally impaired so as to be incapable of making an informed consent to sexual intercourse.

Deviate Sexual Assault: A person commits the crime of deviate sexual assault if he has deviate sexual intercourse with another person knowing that he does so without that person's consent.

First Degree Sexual Misconduct: A person commits the crime of sexual misconduct in the first degree if such person purposely subjects another person to sexual contact without that person's consent.

Second Degree Sexual Misconduct: A person commits the crime of sexual misconduct in the second degree if such person:

  1. Exposes his or her genitals under circumstances in which he or she knows that his or her conduct is likely to cause affront or alarm;
  2. Has sexual contact in the presence of a third person or persons under circumstances in which he or she knows that such conduct is likely to cause affront or alarm; or
  3. Has sexual intercourse or deviate sexual intercourse in a public place in the presence of a third person.

Third Degree Sexual Misconduct: A person commits the crime of sexual misconduct in the third degree if he solicits or requests another person to engage in sexual conduct under circumstances in which he knows that his requests or solicitation is likely to cause affront or alarm.

Sexual Abuse: A person commits the crime of sexual abuse if he subjects another person to sexual contact by the use of forcible compulsion.

Consent: Consent or lack of consent may be expressed or implied. Assent does not constitute consent if:

  • It is given by a person who lacks the mental capacity to authorize the conduct charged to constitute the offense and such mental incapacity is manifest or known to the actor;
  • It is given by a person who by reason of youth, mental disease or defect, or intoxication, is manifestly unable or known by the actor to be unable to make a reasonable judgment as to the nature or harmfulness of the conduct charged to constitute the offense; or
  • It is induced by force, duress, or deception.

(Taken from the University of Central Missouri's Lighthouse webpage)

For information on SEMO policy concerning Sexual Assault, go Here

Common reactions to Sexual Assault:

There is no right or wrong reaction to a Sexual Assault. Here are some reactions that may be expected:

Emotions

  • Shock
  • Numbness
  • Loss of control
  • Disorientation
  • Helplessness
  • Sense of vulnerability
  • Fear
  • Self-blame/guilt for "allowing" the crime to happen
  • Feeling that these reactions are a sign of weakness

Behavior

  • Crying
  • Yelling
  • Shaking
  • Calmness: Seemingly Unaffected
  • Withdrawing from Social Settings
  • Sexual Promiscuity
  • Self-Medication with Alcohol or drugs
  • Lack of Concentration or Energy
  • Change in Eating
  • Nightmares/ Flashbacks

Again, it is important to know that a person may experience any or multiple of these. There is no right or wrong way to feel, but know that there are people here to help.

Contact

Donna St. Sauver, Coordinator
573.986.6899
Text: 573.427.2877

CVPP@semo.edu
Dearmont B1 Wing (Eastern Side)
Counseling and Disability Services
One University Plaza, MS 2030
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701